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The Weekly Roundup

Post Date:04/27/2018 4:30 PM

 

The Weekly Roundup

April 27, 2018 | What’s Doing in Lafayette?

 

City Council and School District Board To Hold Joint Meeting April 30

Following a long-established partnership between the City and Lafayette’s schools, the Lafayette City Council and the Lafayette School District Board will hold a special joint meeting on April 30, 2018, to review items of mutual interest to both the City and the School District.  The meeting, which continues a semi-annual tradition between the City and the community’s schools, will be held at the Lafayette Library and Learning Center, 3491 Mt. Diablo Boulevard, Lafayette, in the Community Hall. A special performance by the Stanley Jazz Messengers will take place at 6:30 and the collaborative meeting begins at 7:00 p.m. 

The Council and School Board Members will discuss traffic near schools and on major roads, public safety and school site security, school finances and the City’s referendum on the June Ballot. The Council and the Board will also hear a Downtown Congestion Plan update and updates on the implications of approved and proposed housing legislation and affordable housing for teachers and City and School District staff. The public is encouraged to attend this special meeting and share input on these matters.

 

Updated Information On This Summer’s PG&E St. Mary’s Road Project

This summer, PG&E will be undertaking the Installation of 6,035 feet of new gas pipeline to replace the aging existing pipe along St. Mary’s Road in both Lafayette and Moraga. The project also includes replacing the valve at the South Lucille Station. Work is due to begin June 7, and PG&E has advised the City of Lafayette that there will be full closures of portions of St. Mary’s Road during the course of the project.

 At a Council meeting on April 23, 2018, the public and the Lafayette City Council provided input to PG&E on the timing and on how the project could be executed to minimize disruption to residents who live adjacent to St. Mary’s Road, as well as the commuters who use the route.  PG&E told the public and Councilmembers that  the 60-day project is expected to run from June 7 through September 17, 2018, in four phases, as follows:

  • Phase 1: Community Park to Rohrer Drive, Full Road Closure - June 7 to July 10 Day Work: Monday through Saturday, 7am to 7pm; and Camino Colorados to Wallabi Court, Full Road Closure - June 7 to July 12 (local traffic allowed), Day Work: Monday through Saturday, 7am to 7pm
  • Phase 2: Wallabi Court to Bollinger Canyon Road: Full Road Closure - July 6 to August 3 (local traffic allowed), Day Work: Monday through Saturday, 7am to 7pm
  • Phase 3: Rohrer Drive to Camino Colorados:  Full Road Closure - July 16 to August 14 (local traffic allowed), Day Work: Monday through Saturday, 7am to 7pm
  • Phase 4: Valve Lot at S Lucille Lane: One Lane Closure -August 22 to September 17 , Day Work: Monday through Saturday, 7am to 7pm

According to PG&E, their schedule was created with the goal to execute the majority of the pipeline installation on St Mary’s Road within the June 7 to August 21 timeframe. This schedule assumes St. Mary’s Road closures as outlined in the construction phases above, Monday through Saturday, 7am to 7pm. PG&E is not planning any night work unless it becomes necessary.

This project, PG&E says, is a priority as the existing welded steel pipelines are considered critical infrastructure and were installed along St. Mary’s Road in 1952. Pipe installed in this era was welded before modern radiography was used to inspect welds and as such the welding inspection was only visual. Additionally, modern manufacturing practices are far superior to those of that era.

PG&E plans a major public awareness campaign prior to the start of the project, with letters sent to Lafayette and Moraga residents that will describe the overall project scope and general traffic impacts. PG&E will also hold open houses to provide information regarding road closure schedules, detour information, project scheduling, work scope, etc.

Residents with questions or concerns are urged to contact PG&E’s Customer Outreach Specialist on the project, Julian Lacson, at 925-348-3532, or by email at J5LR@pge.com.  PG&E has stated that all questions and/or complaints will be handled by their Customer Outreach Specialist within one business day of receipt.

 

Two City Residents Recognized in Annual Lafayette Green Awards

Photo 4 Awards 

At the Lafayette City Council meeting this past week, Mayor Don Tatzin presented the annual Lafayette Awards of Environmental Excellence, more commonly known as the Lafayette Green Awards, to two City residents. The Council recognized the award winners for their outstanding contribution to making Lafayette a more sustainable community and helping the City achieve its environmental goals.  

Kelsey Levante received her Lafayette Green Award for inspiring and educating the Lafayette community about environmental sustainability.  Kelsey has been part of the Campolindo High School Environmental Club, where she has participated in the weekly lunch meetings, helped in the garden after school on Thursdays, has taken a course to learn how to build an aquaponics system for Campolindo High School. The system will be used by the AP Environmental Science classes and the Biology classes as an example of symbiotic, closed-loop system. She has been involved with decreasing the waste stream, growing food on a small scale, and encouraging and inspiring her peers to take on more sustainable practices in their everyday lives.  Kelsey’s passion for all things green is contagious and has had a tangible and positive impact on the community.

Receiving a Lafayette Green Award also this year was James Leach for educating local residents on the climate crisis. James was trained by the Climate Reality Project and is the author of “The Sustainable Way: Straight talk about global warming - what causes it, who denies it, and the common sense transition to renewable energy.” James has been working with Sustainable Lafayette with an emphasis on promoting air quality monitoring. James’ numerous outreach efforts have educated residents on the importance of reducing emissions helping the community contribute toward the core goals of the City’s Environmental Strategy.  James has generously shared his knowledge and insight and has inspired many to follow his example in living more sustainably. 

These Lafayette Green Awards are for work done in 2017, and they mark the eleventh year of the awards. Winners were selected by Lafayette’s Environmental Task Force using three criteria: 1) How successfully do the candidate’s activities reduce their footprint, current and future; 2) How much has the candidate’s activities helped achieve the city’s environmental goals; and 3) How much has the candidate’s activities inspired others in the community and can it be replicated.

 

Council Makes Appointments to the Circulation Commission and the Planning Commission

The Lafayette City Council, at its April 23, 2018, meeting made appointments to the City’s Circulation and the Planning Commissions. Appointed to the Circulation Commission were Susan Candell, Kim Robinson and Vianney Serriere. Gregory Mason was appointed to the Planning Commission.

Susan Candell is an engineer with Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., and has lived in Lafayette for 21 years. She holds a Master’s Degree in Nuclear Engineering from MIT. She services on the boards of the Lafayette Community Foundation, the Springhill Valley Homeowners Association and other organizations.  Her term expires June 30, 2018. Kim Robinson, whose term expires June 30, 2018, is an attorney with the US Department of Labor and has a Master’s Degree from Harvard in education policy. She has been a resident of Lafayette for less than a year. Vianney Serriere, who has lived in Lafayette for 27 years, is an avid bicyclist and astronomer. In addition to his public service, he has 35 years of art direction/graphic design experience working for large corporations. His term ends June 30, 2019.

These new members join Elizabeth Johnson, Chair, Carl Di Giorgio, Vice Chair, Lynn Hiden, Kirstina Strum,  on the Commission.  The Circulation Commission reviews policy matters that affect the City's right-of-way and relate to the Circulation Element of the General Plan. The Commission advises the City Council on matters pertaining to traffic safety, bikeways and other issues.

Gregory Mason is a Senior Structural Plans Examiner with West Coast Code Consultants and has lived in Lafayette for 55 years. He has undertaken a number of volunteer engineering and structural assessments for non-profit organizations. His term expires June 30, 2018.

Mason joins Gary Huisingh, Vice Chair, and Steven Bliss on the Commission. The Planning Commission is charged with development of the General Plan, implementation and administration of the Zoning Ordinance and review of development applications. 

 LC-Dogtown-Poster18-Allstate-391x600 

Pups and Parks!

 The weather is great and it is time to get outside and explore your local parks and trails!  The region provides many opportunities for you to find fun for Fido, but before you pack up your pup make sure you review the rules for Rover.  Below you will find rules for City of Lafayette Parks & Trails, the EBMUD Reservoir Recreation Area and Briones Regional Park (EBRPD).  If liberty from a leash is what Lassie would like, we have also listed off leash opportunities provided by the East Bay Regional Park District and neighboring cities. Please check the park websites for dog requirements.    

Lafayette Parks & Trails (City of Lafayette)

On-Leash at All Times

www.LoveLafayette.org

Lafayette Community Park, Buckeye Fields, Brook Street Park, Leigh Creekside Park, Elam & Margaret Brown Plaza, neighborhood trails & the Lafayette Community Center

Lafayette Reservoir (EBMUD)

On-Leash at All Times

www.ebmud.com/recreation/east-bay/lafayette-reservoir/

3849 Mt. Diablo Blvd. in Lafayette, CA

Briones Regional Park (EBRPD)

On-Leash and Off-Leash Areas

www.ebparks.org/parks/briones

Bear Creek Staging Area

1611 Bear Creek Road, Lafayette

Lafayette Ridge Staging Area

1200 Pleasant Hill Rd, Lafayette

Off-Leash Opportunities

The following parks provide off-leash areas for dogs.  Please be sure to visit their websites to review the specific rules for each park.

Heather Farm Dog Park – Walnut Creek

505 N San Carlos Dr

Walnut Creek, CA 94598

www.walnut-creek.org/departments/arts-and-recreation/recreation-parks/parks-picnic-rentals/dog-park

Paso Nogal Dog Park – Pleasant Hill

501 Paso Nogal Rd

Pleasant Hill, CA 94523

www.pleasanthillrec.com/Facilities/Facility/Details/Paso-Nogal-Park-10

Baldwin Dog Park – Concord

2700 Parkside Cir

Concord, CA 94519

www.cityofconcord.org/page.asp?pid=3025

Newhall Community Park Paw Patch – Concord

Turtle Creek Rd & Ayers Rd

Concord, CA 94521

www.cityofconcord.org/page.asp?pid=3025

Martinez Temporary Dog Park – Martinez

115 Tarantino Dr

Martinez, CA 94553

www.cityofmartinez.org/depts/recreation/parks/dog_park.asp

Rancho Laguna Park Seasonal Off-Leash Run Area – Moraga

2101 Camino Pablo,

Moraga, CA 94556

www.moraga.ca.us/dept/park-rec/parkstrails

Rancho Laguna Park is authorized as an off-leash dog run area:

April 1 to September 30: Park opening to 9:00 am and 6:00 pm to park closing.

October 1 to March 31 park opening to 9:00 am and 4:00 pm to park closing.

East Bay Regional Park District Parks & Trails

There are many on-leash and off-leash opportunities in EBRPD parks.  The following link has a lot of useful information about rules for dogs in EBRPD parks: http://www.ebparks.org/activities/dogs/

 

Poet Laureate Amy Alysa Glynn

Photo 7 Poet

The Lamorinda Arts Council (LAC) introduced Poet Laureate for Lafayette and Orinda Amy Alysa Glynn to the Lafayette City Council at its meeting on Monday, April 23. After a three month search by LAC, Glynn, a Lafayette resident, was chosen by an independent selection committee to serve the two-year term as Poet Laureate.

Glynn is a poet, essayist, and fiction writer whose work appears widely in journals and anthologies including The Best American Poetry. She has been a James Merrill House Fellow, a Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference Scholar, and a Mona van Duyn Scholar at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. She has co-curated “Favorite Poem Project” readings with former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky at Amherst College in 2015 and the Head-Royce School in Oakland in 2017.

During her two-year term as Poet Laureate, Glynn, who receives a yearly $3,000 honorarium from LAC, will be called upon to write poems of occasion for community and civic events. She will also support LAC’s Poet Laureate Program of activities for all ages in the community and schools, and serve as a liaison with literary organizations.  For more information about LAC and its program, please visit www.lamorindaarts.org/volunteer, and check the Poet Laureate box to join us in organizing poetry events and activities.

Glynn was received by the City Council and read a poem she composed to the Councilmembers and the public during the meeting.

Chamise

Adenostoma fasiculatum

There is no wind. The chaparral has gone

to decadence. And the sun, at such a height,

leaves the sky desiccated, bleached ash-white.

A concentrated brightness, an indrawn

 

gathering of the light, as if the whole

world were enclosed within a camera

obscura, an inverted replica

universe cynosured through a pinhole.

 

Even the soil is aching from the heat;

a cracking bed of serpentine where few

species contrive to grow, and those that do

sustain themselves on nothing but complete

 

famine and drought. More than sustain: they flout

the whole system, responding to the mean

conditions with a kind of libertine

excess, oiling themselves elaborately, without

 

a care for consequence. Inviting fire.

Anointing their dry leaves with aromatic

resins just to inspire a dramatic

response. Spontaneous combustion. Dire

 

consequences, but they’ve thought of that

too, developing at once two kinds of seed:

one sprouts in wet soil. One is only freed

if the achene is scorched. This habitat

 

requires certain adaptations. And

rather than being meager in return

for meagerness, why not agree to burn?

Say there is nothing you cannot withstand.

 

(From A Modern Herbal, published by Measure Press, 2013, reprinted with permission of the author.

The poem first appeared in Orion magazine.)

 

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